Jo Nesbo

Every author has a story beyond the one that they put down on paper. The Barnes & Noble Podcast goes between the lines with today’s most interesting writers, exploring what inspires them, what confounds them, and what they were thinking when they wrote the books we’re talking about.

For many writers, the word “vampire” conjures visions of immortal beings of vast powers and romantic destinies. For Jo Nesbo, it meant research into the annals of abnormal psychology, into a world of delusion and obsession more disturbing than any supernatural fable. In this episode of the podcast, the bestselling Norwegian writer talks with Bill Tipper about the stranger-than-fiction cases that inspired The Thirst, Nesbo’s latest novel to feature the world-weary and painfully honest Oslo detective Harry Hole.

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The murder victim, a self-declared Tinder addict. The one solid clue—fragments of rust and paint in her wounds—leaves the investigating team baffled.  Two days later, there’s a second murder: a woman of the same age, a Tinder user, an eerily similar scene.

The chief of police knows there’s only one man for this case. But Harry Hole is no longer with the force. He promised the woman he loves, and he promised himself, that he’d never go back: not after his last case, which put the people closest to him in grave danger.

But there’s something about these murders that catches his attention, something in the details that the investigators have missed. For Harry, it’s like hearing “the voice of a man he was trying not to remember.” Now, despite his promises, despite everything he risks, Harry throws himself back into the hunt for a figure who haunts him, the monster who got away.

See more from Jo Nesbo here.

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