Glamorous Photo Shoot for Girl Who Was Banned from School Picture Day

Marian Scott Photoshoot by Jermaine HortonSchool Picture Day gives kids a chance to preserve memories from one of the most important times in their lives. However, when 8-year-old Marian Scott turned up at her school—Paragon Charter Academy in Jackson, Mississippi—to be photographed, she was turned away for having red hair extensions. 

The school-based its harsh decision on a student handbook policy, which states that pupils’ hair color must be of “natural tones.” Understandably, the situation knocked Marian’s confidence and left her parents confused and frustrated. “If she’s not a disruption to the class,” says her father, “why is she a disruption to the picture?”

Luckily though, Marian’s luck turned around when photographer Jermaine Horton heard about what happened to her. “When I heard about this story I was furious as a parent because the first thing I thought about was the impact of what this would do to such a beautiful little girl,” he wrote on Facebook. “I reached out to Nicole Joy of WILX News 10 who covered the story, and she got me in contact with the parents.” Horton organized a personal photo shoot for Marian, complete with creative costumes, donated from Rich Girl Candy.

The resulting images are far beyond standard school photos, and Marian of course got to keep her red hair extensions. She’s captured posing proudly, with a big smile on her face, showing that individuality should be celebrated. Horton says, “I’m so blessed to have been apart of this [and] to give her an amazing day that showed her that she truly is beautiful and her hair color was the BOMB!” The experience even inspired Horton to continue helping empower other young kids through creative photo shoots, an initiative he calls the Art of Confidence project. He says, “Marian Scott was just the first, but there are so many!”

Scroll down to see Scott’s stunning photo shoot and see more from Horton’s portfolio on his website.

Photographer Jermaine Horton put on a professional photo shoot for 8-year-old Marian Scott after she was denied school pictures for having red hair extensions.

Marian Scott Photoshoot by Jermaine Horton

The situation understandably left Marian feeling singled out, but this creative photo shoot gave her the confidence she deserves.

Marian Scott Photoshoot by Jermaine Horton

And of course, she wore her amazing red hair with pride.

Marian Scott Photoshoot by Jermaine HortonMarian Scott Photoshoot by Jermaine Horton

 

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Man Hand-Knits Sweaters of Places and Then Wears Them in Front of Their Exact Locations

 

Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.

Artist Sam Barsky has a unique way of commemorating the places to which he’s traveled. Instead of opting for the usual tchotchke like a magnet or a coffee mug, he hand-knits his own sweater in advance, depicting imagery from the specific locale he intends to visit. He then goes to that place and poses in front of it while donning his knitted garment. The sweater doubles as a wearable postcard that is impressive in its intricacies, and this can be seen across Barsky’s textile portfolio. His subject matter ranges from fields to bridges to lighthouses to rock formations, and each is instantly recognizable when worn across his chest.

The Baltimore-based artist has been knitting for two decades and produced over 140 sweaters during that time. To him, traveling and knitting go hand in hand. When he travels, he gets inspiration for his garments, and by trekking to those places, he has a purpose for wearing what he has made. “I just finished one of the Mackinac Bridge in Michigan,” Barsky tells My Modern Met, “and I traveled to get a picture there.”

Baltimore is a place that continually pops up in Barsky’s work. Right now, it’s the focus of his knitting. “I am working on finishing up one of the Baltimore Inner Harbor now for some projects there, and after that, I plan to do more Michigan themed sweaters for when I return in January.”

Scroll down for some of Barsky’s travel knitting and then follow him on Instagram to see where he’s off to next.

Artist Sam Barsky creates hand-knitted sweaters featuring imagery from places around the world, and then he goes to those locales and poses in front of them while wearing his custom garment.

Sam Barsky Sweaters

Oriole Park at Camden Yards in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.

Artistic Knitting of Sam Barsky

Yad La-Shiryon in Latrun, Israel

Hand Knit Sweater by Sam Barsky

Grand Canyon in Arizona, U.S.

Knitted Sweater by Sam Barsky

Ellis Island in New York City, New York, U.S.

Knitted Sweater by Sam Barsky

The Statue of Liberty in New York City, New York, U.S.

Artistic Knitting of Sam Barsky

Hudson River (tribute to 9/11) in New York City, New York, U.S.

Artistic Knitting of Sam Barsky

Tower Bridge in London, England

Hand Knit Sweater by Sam Barsky

Windsor Castle in Windsor, United Kingdom

Hand Knit Sweater by Sam Barsky

Creamery Covered Bridge in West Brattleboro, Vermont, U.S.

Sam Barsky Sweaters

Dinosaur Land in White Post, Virginia, U.S.

Sam Barsky Sweaters

Red Rock Canyon in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S.

Hand Knit Sweater by Sam Barsky

Sedona, Arizona, U.S.

Hand Knit Sweater by Sam Barsky

Montgomery College Globe in Germantown, Maryland, U.S.

Knitted Sweater by Sam Barsky

Portland Lighthouse in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, U.S.

Sam Barsky Sweaters

Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.

Sam Barsky Sweaters

Boulder Creek, Colorado, U.S.

Sam Barsky: Instagram | Facebook

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Photographer Captures the Surprisingly Quiet Side of Tokyo at Night

Tokyo Sleeps Tonight Photo Series by Robert Götzfried

Tokyo is the most populated city in the world, with over 38 million people living there. While most of the mega-metropolis is constantly buzzing with activity, there’s still quiet pockets of the city that, when visited at night, seem just like ghost towns. German photographer Robert Götzfried set out to capture these sleepy districts in his aptly titled series, TOKYO SLEEPS TONIGHT.

Götzfried wanted to photograph Japan’s capital away from busy hotspots, so he explored the quiet residential neighborhoods of Minato City—a coastal area in eastern Tokyo. “It’s that part of the city where actual real life people live and hang out—or not,” says the photographer. “Unlike most stories that I have seen about Tokyo before these parts of the city are simply empty at night time. I guess it makes perfect sense—most of the folks have to go to work the next day, just like everywhere else in the world. I found a city that sleeps.”

The off-grid photo series reveals how incredibly quiet this particular part of Tokyo really is at night. With no sign of human life, quiet street corners, empty convenience stores, and neon street signs become the subjects of the photos. Visually, each scene looks silent, but you can almost imagine hearing the quiet hum of the street vending machines, power lines, and changing traffic lights.

How do you imagine Tokyo at night? Find out just how quiet the city can be by checking out Götzfried’s eerie photo series below.

Photographer Robert Götzfried reveals the quiet of Tokyo at night in his series, TOKYO SLEEPS TONIGHT.

Tokyo Sleeps Tonight Photo Series by Robert GötzfriedTokyo Sleeps Tonight Photo Series by Robert Götzfried

The photos were shot in the residential neighborhoods of Minato City.

Tokyo Sleeps Tonight Photo Series by Robert GötzfriedTokyo Sleeps Tonight Photo Series by Robert Götzfried

The eerie location looks just like a ghost town.

Tokyo Sleeps Tonight Photo Series by Robert GötzfriedTokyo Sleeps Tonight Photo Series by Robert GötzfriedTokyo Sleeps Tonight Photo Series by Robert GötzfriedTokyo Sleeps Tonight Photo Series by Robert GötzfriedTokyo Sleeps Tonight Photo Series by Robert GötzfriedTokyo Sleeps Tonight Photo Series by Robert GötzfriedTokyo Sleeps Tonight Photo Series by Robert GötzfriedTokyo Sleeps Tonight Photo Series by Robert GötzfriedTokyo Sleeps Tonight Photo Series by Robert GötzfriedTokyo Sleeps Tonight Photo Series by Robert GötzfriedTokyo Sleeps Tonight Photo Series by Robert GötzfriedTokyo Sleeps Tonight Photo Series by Robert GötzfriedTokyo Sleeps Tonight Photo Series by Robert GötzfriedTokyo Sleeps Tonight Photo Series by Robert Götzfried

Robert Götzfried: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Behance

My Modern Met granted permission to feature images by Robert Götzfried.

 

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Icelandic Artist Creates Colorful Immersive Art Installations Using Hair

 

Art Installation by Hrafnhildur Arnardóttir/Shoplifter

“Nervescape V,” 2016. QAGOMA, Brisbane. (Photo: Natasha Harth)

Icelandic artist Hrafnhildur Arnardóttir, also known as Shoplifter, uses something unusual to create her colorful art installations—hair. Using both synthetic and real hair, she creates giant fantasy landscapes and sculptures that are at once whimsical and mesmerizing. Braided, molded, brushed, and even melted, hair is layered together to create dynamic artwork that radiates energy.

Her fascination with hair began as a child when she saw her grandmother store one of her cut-off braids in a drawer. Later, it became a way for her to explore a medium that is beautiful and comforting, yet can also spark disgust. “I find it fascinating that we have this forever changing ‘vegetation’ all over our bodies, which we have to groom and tame,” Shoplifter shared with Infringe. “Hair is a remnant of the wildness that we possess, and one of the few things that survives our existence. It’s like a shield, or alternatively it can be a way of showing yourself to the world.”

Shoplifter, who has collaborated with Björk in the past, brings whimsy and humor to her work. Her large-scale Nervescape installations see vibrant tufts of hair used to create an environment that she hopes embraces visitors. Seeing the work as a world of imaginary nerve endings, for Shoplifter the pieces are both a reflection of our internal landscape and also a fantasy meant to provide a means of escape. This playfulness is a call to remember our youth and to push positive energy into the world.

Big opportunities continue to come Shoplifter’s way. In 2019, she will represent Iceland in the Venice Biennale. The world will be waiting anxiously to see what she creates given this huge international platform.

Hrafnhildur Arnardóttir, also known as Shoplifter, is an Icelandic installation artist who uses real and synthetic hair as her primary medium.

Art Installation by Hrafnhildur Arnardóttir/Shoplifter

“Nervescape V,” 2016. QAGOMA, Brisbane. (Photo: Natasha Harth)

Installation Made of Hair by Hrafnhildur Arnardóttir/Shoplifter

“Nevrescape VII,” 2017. National Gallery of Iceland. (Photo: Frosti Gnarr)

Art Installation by Hrafnhildur Arnardóttir/Shoplifter

“Nervescape VII,” 2017. National Gallery of Iceland. (Photo: Frosti Gnarr).

Installation Made of Hair by Hrafnhildur Arnardóttir/Shoplifter

“Nervelings,” 2018. Phillips Collection. (Photo: Albert Ting)

Art Installation by Hrafnhildur Arnardóttir/Shoplifter

“Nervescape IV,” 2015. Nordic Biennial.

Installation Made of Hair by Hrafnhildur Arnardóttir/Shoplifter

“Nervescape,” 2012. Collaboration with Kria Brekkan and Cibelle. Clocktower Gallery, New York. (Photo: Michal Jurewicz)

Art Installation by Hrafnhildur Arnardóttir/Shoplifter

“Lonely,” 2018. The Watermill Center, New York. (Photo: Untitled Magazine)

Learn more about Shoplifter’s creative philosophy in this 2016 video.

Hrafnhildur Arnardóttir/Shoplifter: Website | Facebook

My Modern Met granted permission to use photos by Hrafnhildur Arnardóttir/Shoplifter.

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Athletic Ballet Dancers Photographed on the Streets of Melbourne

Phoebe Collins

For over four years, Omar Z. Robles has been photographing ballet dancers from companies around the world. Placing them in an urban setting, he’s able to capture a different view of classical dance—one that is more egalitarian. On a recent trip to Melbourne, Robles was reminded of just how much his work can touch the public.

While in Australia, Robles was met with challenges. In fact, for the first time, he had a dancer cancel their shoot at the last minute, as the dancer’s company didn’t feel his work aligned with their branding. Determined to carry on with the project, but understandably feeling a bit defeated, Robles hit the streets of Melbourne with a different dancer. And it was there that a woman named Sylvie reminded him of why he does what he does.

“It was 4pm-ish one afternoon. I was photographing a dancer in the middle of the tram tracks right next to Flinders Station,” Robles writes. “Crowds of people walked in and out of the station at a time. Suddenly, I heard a loud gasp behind me. I stopped to look. A woman held her hand to her chest, eyes wide open as was her mouth. Standing in awe, a moment now recorded in my mind forever. She turned to me and said ‘I’m so amazed!! In 65 years that I have lived in Melbourne, I have never seen such a beautiful thing. A ballet dancer performing in the middle of the streets.’ Her name was Sylvie. With teary eyes, she walked over to the dancer, gave her a big hug, and left us. My heart dropped, I cried inside a little. She had made my day in a way she didn’t even realize.”

Robles’ story is a reminder that it can sometimes be difficult for artists to understand just how their creativity can affect the general public. Artwork gets published, hung in a gallery, and shared online, but most times the creators aren’t around to hear the impact. By bringing classical dance to the world in an innovative way, Robles is helping a whole new audience appreciate the athleticism of ballet dancers.

It took a stranger’s appreciation to snap Robles back into the power he possesses as an artist. Through his creative decisions and collaborations, he’s opened up the world of dance to the masses, stripping it of its elite trappings and pushing it out into the streets. The lesson learned in Melbourne is one that Robles will remember.

“I shall never again forget or question the weight of my work. Of how utterly strong and transformative art can be. It appeals to the very core of our existence and offers us [an] escape from everyday struggles. Art is power. I will always be gratified to be a vessel to that power. Not for the few but for all.

While photographing ballet dancers in Melbourne, Omar Z. Robles was reminded of just how powerful his art can be.

Dance Photography in Melbourne Omar Z. Robles

Nana Yamamoto

Omar Z. Robles - Melbourne Dance Photography

Tessa Puttnick

Dance Photography in Melbourne Omar Z. Robles

As he was photographing a ballet dancer, a woman named Sylvie approached the scene.

Omar Z. Robles - Melbourne Dance Photography

Tessa Puttnick

Omar Z. Robles - Melbourne Dance Photography

Mia Thorley

Dance Photography in Melbourne Omar Z. Robles

Tessa Puttnick

Dance Photography in Melbourne Omar Z. Robles

Olivia Paine

“I’m so amazed ! In 65 years that I have lived in Melbourne, I have never seen such a beautiful thing. A ballet dancer performing in the middle of the streets,” she exclaimed.

Omar Z. Robles - Melbourne Dance Photography

Ella Chambers

Omar Z. Robles - Melbourne Dance Photography

Clarabelle Ling

Dance Photography in Melbourne Omar Z. Robles

Clarabelle Ling

Omar Z. Robles - Melbourne Dance Photography

Maria Peker

With tears in her eyes, she hugged the dancer and went on her way, but her words stayed with Robles.

Omar Z. Robles - Melbourne Dance Photography

Tessa Puttnick

Omar Z. Robles - Melbourne Dance Photography

Left: Tessa Puttnick / Right: Nana Yamamoto

“No matter where my works end up being hanged or collected some day, I will never get the same satisfaction or forget moments like the one I experienced with Sylvie.”

Dance Photography in Melbourne Omar Z. Robles

Ezlimar Dortolina

Omar Z. Robles - Melbourne Dance Photography

Ella Chambers

The post Athletic Ballet Dancers Photographed on the Streets of Melbourne appeared first on My Modern Met.

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Chicago Architecture Center Will Open to the Public

 

Chicago Architecture Center Wacker Street

The Chicago Architecture Foundation, a non-profit cultural organization that has been promoting Chicago’s architecture since 1966, is about to get a revamp. On August 31, 2018, CAF will open the Chicago Architecture Center on East Wacker Drive, providing a new cultural destination for the Windy City. Located inside an architecturally significant building designed by Mies van der Rohe—a pioneer of Mid-Century Modernism—the center will sprawl across 20,000 square feet.

The CAC is strategically located above the dock for the Foundation’s acclaimed river cruises. Designed by Chicago-based architecture firm Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture (AS + GG), the space will include areas for public programs, an award-winning store, and innovative exhibitions to help the public understand Chicago’s rich architectural history.

The CAC will also be a space to learn about international architecture, with the second-floor Skyscraper Gallery including large-scale models of famous skyscrapers around the world. AS+GG specifically designed an almost 40-foot-tall model of the Jeddah Tower in Saudi Arabi for the installation.

“We can’t wait for people to visit the CAC and experience how Chicago architects have influenced the world through their innovation and vision,” said Lynn Osmond, the President and CEO of CAF. “We’ve engineered a stimulating and immersive space where visitors can have fun discovering Chicago’s groundbreaking architecture—and appreciate its profound impact on the world.”

A little over 50 years after its founding, CAF has grown into one of the largest cultural organizations in Chicago. Through tours, field trips, mentorships, and professional development events, the Foundation continues its mission to show why design matters.

The retail store and walking and bus tours will begin from 111 East Wacker Drive during the first week of August, building toward a week of celebrations leading up to the August 31, 2018 inauguration.

Opening on August 31, 2018, the Chicago Architecture Center is strategically inside a historically significant building along the Chicago River.

Chicago Architecture Center Wacker Street

Photo: Angie McMonigal

Rendering of Chicago Architecture CenterNew Chicago Architecture CenterRendering of Chicago Architecture Center

Interactive exhibitions across two floors will explain Chicago’s rich architectural history.

Rendering of Chicago Architecture CenterRendering of Chicago Architecture CenterRendering of Chicago Architecture Center

The center will also be a place of learning, with lecture halls and a design studio for professional development.

Rendering of Chicago Architecture CenterRendering of Chicago Architecture CenterNew Chicago Architecture Center

Chicago Architecture Foundation: Website | Facebook | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to use images by CAF.

 

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Architects Transform 18th-Century Farmhouse Into Self-Sufficient Modern Home

Ruins Studio - Modern Farmhouse by Nathanael Dorent and Lily Jencks

Converting farmhouses into modern dwellings is a trend that is especially prominent in the UK, where historical farms are upgraded via modern barn conversions and updated farm structures. Architects Nathanael Dorent and Lily Jencks worked together to create Ruins Studio, an incredible 18th-century farmhouse overlooking the Scottish countryside. The result is a crisp, modern piece of residential architecture that successfully integrates the structure’s past.

It’s not surprising that Dorent and Jencks won several design awards for the farmhouse, and were shortlisted for the prestigious RIAS/RIBA Award in Scotland. The exterior combines elements of the existing stone structure with a modern pitched roof mimicking what one typically finds on historical Scottish farmhouses. “To build within the walls of a ruin enforces the idea that our contemporary occupation is just another layer to be added to the rich history that every site possesses,” writes Jencks’ studio.

In allowing history to run through the building, the modern touches don’t seem out of place. The interior is highlighted by a curvilinear “tube” system of walls that recall the stone walls of a cave and embrace the occupants of the residence. Original stone masonry breaks up the interior, accenting the different rooms and aiding in the creation of a historical palimpsest. “Openings in the existing ruins walls define the location for windows, which, in turn, form the curves of the interior shell,” explains Jencks. “Seen together these layers are like a geode, each one a surprising opposition to the layer that surrounds it, as if grown over time.”

Running on solar power, the home was designed to be self-sufficient due to its remote location. Large windows allow the homeowners to take in the sweeping views (over 50 miles of pasture) and enjoy living within a piece of history.

Architects Nathanael Dorent and Lily Jencks worked together to convert an 18th-century Scottish farmhouse into a modern dwelling.

Scottish Farmhouse Conversion by Nathanael Dorent and Lily JencksRuins Studio - Modern Farmhouse by Nathanael Dorent and Lily Jencks

They incorporated the structure’s original masonry seamlessly across the interior and exterior, pulling in the farm’s history.

Ruins Studio - Modern Farmhouse by Nathanael Dorent and Lily JencksModern Farmhouse Conversion in Scotland by Nathanael Dorent and Lily JencksScottish Farmhouse ConversionScottish Farmhouse Conversion by Nathanael Dorent and Lily Jencks

Large windows allow occupants to take in the beauty of the Scottish countryside from the comfort of the self-sufficient home.

Modern Farmhouse Conversion in Scotland by Nathanael Dorent and Lily JencksScottish Farmhouse Conversion by Nathanael Dorent and Lily JencksScottish Farmhouse Conversion by Nathanael Dorent and Lily JencksNathanael Dorent: Website | Facebook 
Lily Jencks: Website
h/t: [Colossal]

All images via Sergio Pirrone.

 

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California Passes First Law in the Country to Require Solar Panels on New Homes

 

Photo: Stonel via Shutterstock

New homes in California are about to become a lot more energy efficient. By a vote of 5-0 from the California Energy Commission (CEC), all homes built from 2020 onward will be required to incorporate solar energy measures. The unanimous vote continues to position California as a leader of legislation to help protect the environment.

The new law will go a long way in helping California meet its lofty goal of cutting greenhouse gas emissions 40% below 1990 levels by 2030. It’s a measure embraced on all sides, supported by the California Building Industry Association. The law is the first of its kind in the nation and will require all single-family homes, as well as condos and apartments up to three stories, to include solar panels in order to receive a building permit. Exceptions may be issued for homes shaded by trees or with roofs too narrow to accommodate solar panels.

Safe California Energy estimates that the code change will save Californians $1.7 billion in energy costs over the next 30 years and save homeowners an average of $16,251 over the life of each building. Of course, the measures will add up-front costs to new building construction. CEC estimates an increase of $9,500 in building costs. With California having one of the most expensive housing markets in the United States—the median price of a single-family home reaching about $565,000—some are concerned this increased construction costs will push people out of state.

But, if homeowners and developers are willing to look long-term, the positives appear to outweigh the negatives. “I know from experience that energy-efficient homes sell faster and bring a better price, and data from the Department of Energy backs me up on that,” shares Brandon De Young, executive vice president of De Young Properties, which specializes in energy-efficient construction. “People don’t want to throw money away on wasted energy when they can move into a more efficient, comfortable, and healthy house instead.”

California Energy Efficiency Code

Photo: Climber 1959 via Shutterstock

The code also allows for solar panel installation in communal areas, as well as batteries such as the Tesla Powerwall, for energy storage. Additionally, the law instates new requirements for ventilation and lighting updates for commercial buildings—both measures with an aim to increase energy efficiency.

As the law does not require approval by the Legislature, an updated building code is almost surely on the horizon. It needs final approval by the California Building Standards Commission, but they almost always follow the recommendations of CEC. Other states across the US will undoubtedly be looking to see how the new code performs. Some are skeptical, believing that it would be wiser to invest in large-scale solar farms rather than single homes.

“It is a pretty big stretch to imagine certainly any Southeastern state following suit in the near term, but the technology is getting cheaper and cheaper and the public is starting to clamor for it,” Steve Kalland, executive director of the North Carolina Clean Energy Technology Center at North Carolina State University told The Wall Street Journal. “In North Carolina, the market is much more oriented toward larger scale solar farms.”

Still, there’s no doubt that all eyes will be on California as it continues to lead the nation in energy efficiency.

 

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France Is Going to Ban Stores From Throwing Away Unsold Clothing

France Clothing Waste Law Sustainability

France has been ahead of the eco-friendly curve for years. From a solar-powered road to upcycled installations, the country has continuously found creative ways to make environmentalism its mission. Following in the footsteps of a 2015 food waste law, the French government has turned its attention to textiles, making it illegal for retailers to throw away unsold clothing.

In the past, French clothing stores would typically discard any leftover apparel. Before being thrown away, these perfectly good pieces of clothing were often defaced in an attempt to deter dumpster scavenging, culminating in four million tons of unwearable, wasted clothes. Thanks to this new law, however, stores will now be required to donate any unsold articles of clothing to charity—a move that will eliminate unnecessary refuse while also helping those in need.

For months, this initiative has been a priority for Emmaus—a Paris-based organization focused on ending homelessness. In February, a Facebook photo depicting destroyed clothing went viral, causing public outcry and bringing the issue to Emmaus’ attention. Since then, the charity has worked tirelessly to fix the problem, which French Prime Minister Édouard Philippe has vowed to tackle with this new law in 2019. “For the time being, there are no specific indications,” Emmaus’ Deputy Director Valérie Fayard explains. “It’s a preliminary road map, but it’s good news.”

In an effort to prevent clothing waste, France will ban retailers from throwing away unsold apparel next year.

France Clothing Waste Law Sustainability

h/t: [Green Matters]

 

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