Sunday House / Teeland Architects


© Jared Fowler

© Jared Fowler


© Jared Fowler


© Jared Fowler


© Jared Fowler


© Jared Fowler

  • Architects: Teeland Architects
  • Location: Noosa, QLD, Australia
  • Architect In Charge: David Teeland, Jong Sook Kim
  • Area: 400.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: Jared Fowler

© Jared Fowler

© Jared Fowler

Our clients purchased a late 1970’s modernist brick beach house in Noosa, Australia for a subtropical retreat from the cool Victorian climate. The house was located on a wonderful site that backed onto the Noosa National Park and surfing beaches. The existing dark brown brick residence, although well constructed at the time, had visually dated quite badly and did not take best advantage of the amazing site that backed onto a subtropical rainforest. The owners brief was to modernise the house while retaining as much of the existing building structure as possible.


© Jared Fowler

© Jared Fowler

One of the challenges with the existing house is that it did not take full advantage of the fantastic location backing onto the national park. The rear of the house was largely a solid brick wall looking onto this beautiful view. We proposed carving out a series of new openings in the rear wall so that bedrooms and bathrooms would look out onto this very private serene landscape. Originally, the house was quite dark internally so we pushed a series of timber lined light wells up through the roof. This allowed natural light to flow in from a high level, as well from the new openings in the brick walls.


© Jared Fowler

© Jared Fowler

Upper Level Plan

Upper Level Plan

© Jared Fowler

© Jared Fowler

The other significant challenge to modernise the existing house was how to transform the front street elevation. The original house had an unflattering rough dark brown brick facade with two equally brown garage doors. A separate consideration was that the street elevation faced east and hot morning sun would blast in through the kitchen and dining windows in summer. Our approach was to render the brick in a natural cement finish and design a beautiful timber screen that sat in front of the original facade. This light weight hardwood structure resulted in a refined modern elevation to the street, while also providing sun protection and privacy for the internal spaces.One of the most unique and delightful design elements of the new house is the semi outdoor bathrooms that look out onto the national park. The original house had an aged light brown plastic shower unit that sat on the back deck, where you could shower outside looking into the forest. The owners loved this feature, so we designed the new bathrooms as hardwood boxes with copper fittings that are largely open onto the private subtropical rainforest.


© Jared Fowler

© Jared Fowler

Product Description. Our clients purchased a late 1970’s modernist brick beach house in Noosa, Australia for a subtropical retreat from the cool Victorian climate. The house was located on a wonderful site that backed onto the Noosa National Park and surfing beaches. The existing dark brown brick residence, although well constructed at the time, had visually dated quite badly and did not take best advantage of the amazing site that backed onto a subtropical rainforest. The owners brief was to modernise the house while retaining as much of the existing building structure as possible.


© Jared Fowler

© Jared Fowler

http://ift.tt/2gz71VY

Bauhaus Museum Dessau Beginning Construction with Foundation Stone Ceremony


Courtesy of González Hinz Zabala

Courtesy of González Hinz Zabala

The first piece of the new Bauhaus Museum Dessau will be set into place this weekend as part of the “Bauhaus Building 90th Anniversary” event, one year after Barcelona architects González Hinz Zabala were selected as the winners of a fierce international competition for the commission.

González Hinz Zabala’s open concept, “Black Box” design was originally selected as a joint 1st place winner with a proposal from New York architects Young & Ayata in September of last year, and then awarded the commission for the final design in December following further fine tuning of the design.


Courtesy of González Hinz Zabala

Courtesy of González Hinz Zabala

“We succeeded, in collaboration with the architects, to further densify the museum concept in the process. The approach by González Hinz Zabala – to envision the Bauhaus Museum Dessau as an interplay between a hermetic spatial structure and an open-plan ground floor – now appears even more convincing. Also because the complex was given more of an aesthetic workshop character in this planning effort,” said Claudia Perren, Bauhaus Dessau Foundation director.

“This does not only correspond to the Bauhaus idea but also reflects the professional identity of the young generation of architects: Away from representational towards and interacting edifice with much room for experiments. I am positive that the Bauhaus Museum Dessau will become a very vibrant and open place.”

The design is envisioned as a dual structure system – on the second floor a “Black Box” gallery will house the program elements of “collection, custody and care,” with an airtight spatial structure to present the collection. Its counterpart on the ground floor is a flexible “open stage” space that will allow a variety of stagings and events to connect to the surrounding park and open space.

“All in all, it was a very dense iterative planning process that has yielded very convincing results. We optimised the volume of the building, including planning of usable areas, developed a convincing air-conditioning solution in interaction with the glass façade and matched interior materials to the museum program and function,” said Frank Assmann, head of the Bauhaus Dessau Foundation Construction Department.

The Bauhaus Museum Dessau is scheduled to be completed in time for 100th anniversary of the Bauhaus foundation in 2019. Upon completion, it house the huge collection of the Bauhaus Dessau Foundation, whose 40,000 exhibits make it the second-largest Bauhaus Collection in the world.

Project Credits

Client: Stiftung Bauhaus DessauBauhaus Dessau Foundation and the city of Dessau-Roßlau
Location: Dessau, Germany
Gross Floor Area: 5.513 m2
Architects: Addenda (GONZALEZ HINZ ZABALA SLP): Roberto González, Anne K. Hinz, Cecilia Rodriguez, Arnau Sastre, José Zabala
Local architect: BAL Bauplanungs und Steuerungs GmbH: Stefano Magistretti
Landscape architects: Roser Vives de Delàs, Patricia Pérez Rumpler 

News via Bauhaus Museum Dessau.

Foundation Bauhaus Dessau Announces Winners of Bauhaus Museum Competition
//cdn.embedly.com/widgets/platform.js

http://ift.tt/2gyYUc7

Photos from Canada

Lake Louise in Banff National Park…Alberta is such a beautiful place ❤️📸 @marlonduque

👉🏼follow us and use #travelcanada or tag @travelcanada_ on your shots to share them with us !
.
.
.
#canada #explorecanada #alberta #explorealberta #banffnationalpark #nature #beautiful #lakelouise #lake #snow #mountains #trees #landscape #reflection #adventure #wanderlust #destination #canadiandestinations #ig_shotz_nov16 #viewsaddict #photography #photographer #instagood #instadaily (at Lake Louise, Alberta)

http://ift.tt/1Re4v3F

St. Nicholas School / aflalo/gasperini arquitetos


© Ana Mello

© Ana Mello


© Ana Mello


© Ana Mello


© Ana Mello


© Ana Mello


© Ana Mello

© Ana Mello

From the architect. An elementary and high school for pupils aged between 2 and 17, the construction houses adjoining collective spaces featuring partial isolation between the three different school levels: Infant, Junior and Senior. A backbone


© Ana Mello

© Ana Mello

creates connectivity between all spaces, with the three scholastic levels, the spaces of common use – dining hall, game courts, theater, football field, arts complex – and the socialising areas scattered throughout the large garden that separates the blocks from the classrooms.


© Ana Mello

© Ana Mello

Site Plan

Site Plan

© Ana Mello

© Ana Mello

The volumes’ dynamic installation allowed the privacy of each age group’s playground, and at the same time favored a permeability between them through the woods. The project design is formed by the balanced disposition of occupied spaces and the empty spaces formed between them. The volumetry’s inclined planes create shading over the classroom terraces, on the facades of the various spaces and on the access passageways which are open and integrated with the green areas.


© Ana Mello

© Ana Mello

http://ift.tt/2gLoOIR

Jean Nouvel’s First Melbourne Tower Receives Go-Ahead


Courtesy of Sterling Global

Courtesy of Sterling Global

Ateliers Jean Nouvel and Australian firm Architectus’ 70-story mixed-use tower, 383 La Trobe Street, will be the newest addition to the Melbourne skyline, after its approval by the Victoria Department of Planning.

Upon completion, the building will be Nouvel’s first project in Melbourne and second in Australia following One Central Park in Sydney, which was named the  Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) Best Tall Building Worldwide in 2014.


Courtesy of Sterling Global

Courtesy of Sterling Global

The 242 meter (827 foot) tower will feature a gridded facade with varying fenestration on each elevation – including the signature south facade, which has been inspired a curtain in Frank Lloyd Wright’s Hillside Theatre at Taliesin.


Courtesy of Sterling Global

Courtesy of Sterling Global

Inside, the tower will contain 488 apartment units and a 196-room hotel organized around four sky gardens. Approximately one third of the 2,850 square meter site will be designated for public space, containing galleries, restaurants, a bar, retail spaces and an internal arcade for digital art installations.

In addition, a book exchange library run in partnership with Victoria University will allow visitors and residents to borrow and donate books.

News via ArchitectureAU + Urban Melbourne.

http://ift.tt/2gL5USs

Camp Baird / Malcolm Davis Architecture


© Joe Fletcher

© Joe Fletcher


© Joe Fletcher


© Joe Fletcher


© Joe Fletcher


© Joe Fletcher

  • Landscape Architect: Cary Bush of Merge Studio
  • Contractor: Simon Fairweather & Associates

© Joe Fletcher

© Joe Fletcher

From the architect. Malcolm Davis Architecture built an incredible contextual indoor/outdoor living space. This off the grid home sits on a stunning 165-wooded acre property in a valley west of Healdsburg. Previously working with the Baird family for their first home in the Bay Area, Malcolm Davis already understood the family and their design aesthetic.


© Joe Fletcher

© Joe Fletcher

The home, similar to their very own family campground, is outfitted for the family yearning to unplug from their fast-paced lives and connect to the outdoors. The property has two main structures – a car and barn equipment shed and a main structure, which has three primary enclosed multi-function spaces on opposite ends of the central south-facing porch. These spaces can be used for sleeping, practicing yoga and games. The backyard has an 82-foot long solar-heated swimming pool, a concrete outdoor fireplace used for grilling and cooking and a partially screened outdoor shower, which also functions as their primary shower. In addition, the backyard is the families playground which includes a tree house, rope swing, archery area and two large grass areas flank the east and west end of property for outdoor activities.


© Joe Fletcher

© Joe Fletcher

“Camp Baird” is a fully functional, efficient and sustainable compound. The three enclosed rooms can be fully heated by Rais wood stoves while the kitchen is heavily insulated to stay cool on hot summer days. The galvanized metal roofs reduce heat build up and the metal cladding and hardwood Ipe decks in this Wildland Urban Interface zone minimize fire threat. The landscape, done by Cary Bush of Merge Studio, is filled with drought tolerant native species with a row of trees at the parking area to provide future shade for visiting cars. In addition, a snake fence – a 30″ tall metal wall – keeps the immediate compound free from critters.


© Joe Fletcher

© Joe Fletcher

Product Description: The buildings are clad in CorTen metal on the walls and galvanized metal roofs. The CorTen allows the simple shed structures to blend into the landscape. The galvanized metal roofs reduce heat build up. The metal cladding and hardwood Ipe decks in this Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) zone minimize fire threat.


© Joe Fletcher

© Joe Fletcher

http://ift.tt/2gKVpyC