Albion Barn / Studio Seilern Architects


© Philip Vile

© Philip Vile


© Philip Vile


© Philip Vile


© Philip Vile


© Philip Vile

  • Structural Engineer: TALL Engineers
  • Services Engineer: Atelier TEN
  • Lighting Consultant: Sutton Vane Associates
  • Quantity Surveyor: BAQUS

© Philip Vile

© Philip Vile

 

Old Belchers Farm is a 17th Century farmhouse with a collection of barns and stables. The buildings have Historic Interest Building Status and the property falls within the Conservation Area of Little Milton.


© Philip Vile

© Philip Vile

The project brief was for a conversion that was to offer a new contemporary art and exhibition space that would help contribute to the upkeep of the estate, consisting of a dining room and of ces that wrap around a hidden library at the centre of the project.


© Philip Vile

© Philip Vile

This library, the heart of the concept, contains four secret doors that when opened connect to the surrounding spaces. When these doors are closed, the room is lined with bookshelves on all sides. It has a mirrored polished steel ceiling, which doubles the perceived height of the space by creating bookshelves that seem to extend to in nity. A set of thin L-shaped steel plates create a very light cantilevered balcony, allowing access to the higher bookshelves while maintaining their visual verticality.


Section

Section

This creates a reading room with an intimate ambiance contrasting with the surrounding bright lit rooms.


© Philip Vile

© Philip Vile

The main barn is located aside from the house courtyard setting, out of view from the High Street and just inside the private access road, as it enters into the courtyard. A lean-to block addition with asbestos roof was added to the main barn at some stage to the south elevation, obscuring the main barn and forming the boundary wall to the neighbouring property Betts Farm House.


© Philip Vile

© Philip Vile

Describing the design, Christina Seilern, said: “While the galleries are pared-down in design, the library is somewhat whimsical. It has a mirrored polished steel ceiling, which doubles the perceived ceiling height of the space by creating bookshelves that seem to extend to in nity. A set of thin L-shaped steel plates create a very light cantilevered balcony that allows access to the higher bookshelves, while maintaining their visual verticality.’

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Steven Holl Receives Approval for Kennedy Center Pedestrian Bridge


Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

Steven Holl Architects have received the go-ahead for a new pedestrian bridge linking their own Kennedy Center Expansion to the Potomac riverfront. Originally proposed by Kennedy Center architect Edward Durell Stone in 1959, the idea to extend the lively arts program from the center along the waterfront is set to increase the vitality of both existing programs. The bridge approval was one of the last remaining piece of the project, with the majority of the Kennedy Center Expansion already under construction.


Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

The Kennedy Center, a national center for performing arts, was established in memoriam of President John F. Kennedy in 1959. The prestigious original building was marked for expansion, and a competition in 2013 saw Steven Holl Architects selected to undertake the design. The expansion encompasses the area south of the center to the waterfront, integrating the landscape and river into the center’s existing program. The bridge is an integral part of this plan, giving direct pedestrian access across this new zone.


Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

In the landscape adjacent to the main expansion building towards the riverfront, various gardens and landscaped areas will play host to outdoor performances and on-site installations. A new cafe will further encourage the movement of activity from the waterfront upwards to the Kennedy Center. 


Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

The bridge itself will also connect the center to Georgetown to the north and the Lincoln Memorial to the south to create new public access. With its approval, construction will take place within the next two years, completing Steven Holl Architects’ engagement with the center. 

For more information on Steven Holl’s active projects, check out our recent round-up.

News via Steven Holl Architects.

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Lingenhel / destilat


© Monika Nguyen

© Monika Nguyen


© Monika Nguyen


© Monika Nguyen


© Monika Nguyen


© Monika Nguyen


© Monika Nguyen

© Monika Nguyen

From the architect. The “Lingenhel opening” marks the completion of destilat’s most important project in recent times.
This project is very unique and was therefore quite an extraordinary challenge for an interior design firm such as destilat. The visual and spatial identity for Johann Lingenhel’s culinary-gastronomic vision was developed from scratch for this project, since no corresponding definition of it existed initially.


© Monika Nguyen

© Monika Nguyen

The two cornerstones of this architectural concept by destilat (www.destilat.at) are the project’s listed building on Landstrasser Hauptstrasse in Vienna and Lingenhel’s corporate identity.


Plan

Plan

Its counters, bars, and presentation furniture evoke images of cubically stacked wooden beams, which were inspired by the beams of the historic roof truss. Surface structures and haptics play significant roles in this concept. Patination reflects their change, which develops over the course of time; as a result, the building’s long history as well as the production processes of certain foods find their place in this house.


© Monika Nguyen

© Monika Nguyen

The central idea of this concept is not to fight against natural ageing processes but use them to increase quality. This turns ageing processes into improvement processes, which are naturally associated with the tasteful ripening of cheese or raw ham.


© Monika Nguyen

© Monika Nguyen

The counter will become more and more beautiful by being used daily. It captures its very own history over the course of time in the process.


© Monika Nguyen

© Monika Nguyen

The architectural concept’s second cornerstone – Lingenhel’s corporate identity, which was developed by Germaine Cap de Ville – plays a central role in this interior design project with its “Lingenhel check” pattern.

The check pattern is transformed from its abstract graphic origins into the basis for wall-mounted product presentations. Translated into the third dimension, it ultimately turns into shelves, which are used to present wine.


© Monika Nguyen

© Monika Nguyen

One of the Lingenhel universe’s central areas surely is the public cheese dairy with its adjacent tasting and event room in the historic court stables.

In this area, the goal was to merge the cheese dairy’s hygienic requirements with an atmospheric and multifunctional event room.


© Monika Nguyen

© Monika Nguyen

The area of the cheese dairy is separated from the rest of the room by a glass wall and can only be accessed through a hygienic sluice. The room’s sophisticated light installation evokes the image of a theatre stage, which deliberately puts the cheese-making process in the central limelight.


© Monika Nguyen

© Monika Nguyen

The huge central table made of raw wooden beams and the two minimalistic wire-mesh chandeliers give the tasting room its archaic flair, which corresponds with the room’s character and, at the same time, provide attractive contrasts to the cheese dairy’s sober, industrial atmosphere.


© Monika Nguyen

© Monika Nguyen

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A great blue heron enjoys an amazing sunset at Back Bay National…

A great blue heron enjoys an amazing sunset at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Located on the southern coast of Virginia, Back Bay provides feeding and resting habitat for migratory birds. The refuge contains over 9,250 acres and is a great place for boating, biking and enjoying the beautiful views. Photo by Robert Merrill (http://ift.tt/18oFfjl).

Material Focus: Salling Tower by Dorte Mandrup Arkitekter


© Torben Eskerod

© Torben Eskerod

This article is part of our new “Material Focus” series, which asks architects to elaborate on the thought process behind their material choices and sheds light on the steps required to get buildings actually built.

Installed last year, the Salling Tower provides a striking, sculptural landmark in Aarhus Docklands. From inside, its deceptively simple counterbalanced form provides a range of ways to look out over the harbor and the city – but from the outside the project’s designers, Dorte Mandrup Arkitekter wanted the tower to take on an abstract appearance, referencing nautical themes with its sail-like shape and porthole-like openings all while obscuring the process of its own construction. To do this, the firm created a structure composed entirely of a single steel piece resting on top of its foundations. In this interview, project architect Noel Wibrand tells us about how the project’s material choice contributed to the construction process.


© Torben Eskerod


© Torben Eskerod


© Torben Eskerod


© Torben Eskerod


© Torben Eskerod

© Torben Eskerod

What were the principal materials used in the project?

The viewing tower consists entirely of steel plates. Sheets vary in thickness from 20 to 30 millimeters. The construction is welded into one piece, which was mounted on a concrete foundation in a counterbalance structure. All steel parts were painted with a white paint used in the off-shore industry.


The project's drawings show how the steel plates were welded together into a single piece.

The project's drawings show how the steel plates were welded together into a single piece.

In terms of materials, what were your biggest sources of inspiration and influence when selecting what the project would ultimately be made of?

The viewing tower is conceptualized as a huge “origami” structure, and the picture of a piece of folded paper was used as design criteria in the tender and detailing phases.


© Torben Eskerod

© Torben Eskerod

Describe how material decisions factored into concept design.

The challenge in this design was to maintain the original idea as well a keeping the abstract feel of the design. The detail design process was very much about reducing and simplifying the detailing.

A very large part of the design resources was put into calculating loads and stability for the tower. With its many tilted faces this required a good amount of technical knowledge and skill with computer simulations and calculations. Søren Jensen Engineers provided a sound a professional expertise at this.


© Torben Eskerod

© Torben Eskerod

What were the advantages that this material offered in the construction of the project?

The advantage of using a homogeneous material, and having no climatic shell or requirements is that you actually can obtain a simple and light structure. The holes in the tower also helps reduce windloads and create a 20% reduction in material, along with freedom to place openings towards views of the city. The tower itself weighs approximately 85 metric tonnes.


© Torben Eskerod

© Torben Eskerod

Were there any challenges you faced because of your material selection?

Another challenge in the design was to connect the very small “footprint” of the tower with foundations. Even though the old harbor front has been used for loading cargo onto ships, the documentation for this specific construction required thorough investigations.


© Torben Eskerod

© Torben Eskerod

Did you consider any other possible materials for the project, and if so how would that have changed the design?

We did considering a lighter construction, with metal sheets on a rib structure. This alternative would have been much lighter, and easier to calculate and build on site, but would have resulted in a much less elegant design, as well as a less spectacular mounting process. One function of the tower was also to create an event to put attention to the development of Aarhus harbor.

Salling Tower / Dorte Mandrup Arkitekter//cdn.embedly.com/widgets/platform.js

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Along the Levee / R3Architetti


© Twin Pixel Video

© Twin Pixel Video


© Twin Pixel Video


© Twin Pixel Video


© Twin Pixel Video


© Twin Pixel Video


© Twin Pixel Video

© Twin Pixel Video

This project arises from the client’s need to combine a two-room and a three-room flat into one apartment that would better accommodate the family’s new needs. The project strategy entails a clear division between the living and the sleeping areas and includes, within the distributive scheme, a little study area that would host the administrative headquarters of the family business.


© Twin Pixel Video

© Twin Pixel Video

We have imagined to spatially define an interior landscape through a prism, a levee that divides and, at the same time, conceals the most private functions of the house. This expedient has allowed us to conceive the living area as a sort of ‘outdoor’ space for the family’s most social activities.


Diagram

Diagram

Diagram

Diagram

The fil rouge that connects “Along the Levee” to our previous works is the choice of the materials which are, once more, raw, undisguised elements enhanced in their most authentic expression. Special care has been given in finding their harmonic combination, often obtained through contrast: the earth’s dense texture is softened by the ethereal quality of the resin, the harshness of concrete is tempered by the warmth of wood.


© Twin Pixel Video

© Twin Pixel Video

The building process mirrors our vision for the project, where the integration and contamination between the artisans’ custom made work and the project’s technical expertise is paramount.


© Twin Pixel Video

© Twin Pixel Video

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HASSELL + OMA Reveal Design for New Museum for Western Australia


The New Museum for Western Australia. Image Courtesy of HASSEL + OMA

The New Museum for Western Australia. Image Courtesy of HASSEL + OMA

With the contract to design and build the museum in Perth officially awarded to contractor Brookfield Multiplex, HASSELL + OMA have revealed the design for the New Museum for Western Australia. The WA Government commissioned HASSEL + OMA to design the cultural institution in April of this year. 

HASSELL Principal and Board Director Mark Loughnan, and OMA Managing Partner-Architect David Gianotten stated: “Our vision for the design was to create spaces that promote engagement and collaboration, responding to the needs of the Museum and the community. We want it to create a civic place for everyone, an interesting mix of heritage and contemporary architecture, that helps revitalize the Perth Cultural Centre while celebrating the culture of Western Australia on the world stage. The design is based on the intersection of a horizontal and vertical loop creating large possibilities of curatorial strategies for both temporary and fixed exhibitions.” 


New Museum – Museum Street entrance. Image Courtesy of HASSEL + OMA

New Museum – Museum Street entrance. Image Courtesy of HASSEL + OMA

The images of the project reveal ample public space and an impressive combination of new structures and existing heritage buildings. The designers explain that the driving concept of the scheme is “a public space that is the central point of the new museum, in terms of both location and programming.” This “outdoor room” seeks to increase public presence in the area, especially when the museum is not officially open. 


Courtesy of HASSEL + OMA

Courtesy of HASSEL + OMA

New Museum seen from Francis Street. Image Courtesy of HASSEL + OMA

New Museum seen from Francis Street. Image Courtesy of HASSEL + OMA

The New Museum is due to be completed in 2020, with main construction beginning next year. 


New Museum Francis Street façade. Image Courtesy of HASSEL + OMA

New Museum Francis Street façade. Image Courtesy of HASSEL + OMA

New Museum with projections at night. Image Courtesy of HASSEL + OMA

New Museum with projections at night. Image Courtesy of HASSEL + OMA

News via OMA

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