Lenticular clouds are stationary, saucer-shaped clouds that form…

Lenticular clouds are stationary, saucer-shaped clouds that form when moist air is pushed over large obstructions. As the tallest mountain in the Cascade Range, Mount Rainier in Washington is a great place to see these unique cloud formations. If you don’t care about the clouds, you can still enjoy amazing recreation, wildlife watching and cultural history at Mount Rainier National Park. Photo by Jacklyn Fraizer (www.sharetheexperience.org)

 

Don’t call it a bunny. This is a black-tailed jackrabbit at…

Don’t call it a bunny. This is a black-tailed jackrabbit at Hopper Mountain and Bitter Creek National Wildlife Refuges in California. Common across the western U.S., they’re known for their short black tails, powerful back legs and really long ears. This one does not look amused at your April Fools prank. Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

 

As the sun nears the horizon of this huge, high-elevation valley…

As the sun nears the horizon of this huge, high-elevation valley at Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, its intense light shines through soft atmospheric haze – shifting the color spectrum toward crimson. Early explorers were moved by this phenomenon and named this Colorado mountain range Sangre de Cristo, meaning the “Blood of Christ.” Visitors today are also inspired by the vibrant color and light in these mountains, which reach over 14,000 feet! Photo by Patrick Myers, National Park Service.

 

It’s that time of year when baby bald eagles start hatching! 🐣…

It’s that time of year when baby bald eagles start hatching! 🐣 Once on the verge of extinction because of habitat destruction, illegal shooting and contamination of its food source, the bald eagle is thriving today thanks to conservation efforts. Bald eagles live near rivers, lakes, marshes – and on public lands across the country. They mate for life, and typically lay 1-3 eggs from February to mid-April. Both adults incubate the eggs, which hatch about 35 days later, and new chicks keep the parents busy until they can fly from the nest around 3 months old. This year, eaglets have been hatching at Channel Islands National Park in California, the National Arboretum in D.C. and Florida’s Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (pictured here). Photo by Mark Cook, South Florida Water Management District.

 

Land and sky collide as wispy clouds creep between rolling…

Land and sky collide as wispy clouds creep between rolling mountains along the Blue Ridge Parkway in North Carolina. The drifting clouds and forested peaks create layers of white and green, stretching out to the horizon. The parkway is only 469 miles long, but the views are endless. Photo courtesy of Joshua Moore.

 

It’s Manatee Appreciation Day! These gentle giants can grow to…

It’s Manatee Appreciation Day! These gentle giants can grow to over 14 feet in length and weigh over 3,000 pounds. Also, known as “sea cows,” manatees feed on seagrasses and other aquatic plants. Today, the total population is estimated to be at least 13,000 manatees, with more than 6,500 in the southeastern United States and Puerto Rico. When aerial surveys began in 1991, there were only an estimated 1,267 manatees in Florida. Check out more fun facts about manatees: https://on.doi.gov/2fpJzxv Photo from Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge Complex by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

 

On foggy mornings, an eerie calm falls over Sam D. Hamilton…

On foggy mornings, an eerie calm falls over Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge in Mississippi. The water is still and the air is thick. With 48,000 acres of forests, fields and waters, the refuge is excellent habitat for eagles, alligators and the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker. Visitors enjoy fishing, hunting, hiking, and wildlife photography and observation. The refuge also serves as an outdoor classroom for Mississippi State University and other local educational institutions. Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

 

We can’t get enough of the National Park of American Samoa. Like…

We can’t get enough of the National Park of American Samoa. Like an emerald set in an ocean of aquamarine, this jewel of a park welcomes visitors to a world of sights, sounds and experiences unlike any other national park in the United States. You can celebrate Samoan culture, spot exotic birds, snorkel in clear ocean waters and hike up into the lush mountains for unforgettable views. And after all that, you can just lay on the perfect white sand beach. Photo by National Park Service.

 

Colorado National Monument preserves one of the grand landscapes…

Colorado National Monument preserves one of the grand landscapes of the American West. Towering monoliths exist within a vast plateau and canyon panorama. You can experience sheer-walled, red rock canyons along the twists and turns of Rim Rock Drive, where you could spy bighorn sheep and soaring eagles. And if you visit in winter, you might get to see early morning fog engulfing the landscape in a cloud inversion. Photo by Larry Bennett (www.sharetheexperience.org).

 

To watch the sunrise, most people face east. At Grand Teton…

To watch the sunrise, most people face east. At Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming, turning west will allow you to see the morning’s first rays touch the peaks and work their way down the mountain faces, spreading light, warmth and beauty. Shades of orange and pink glow on the snow to create a picture perfect moment. Photo by John Corso (www.sharetheexperience.org).