A Door for my Parents / Genoveva Carrión Ruiz


© Nelohagen

© Nelohagen


© Nelohagen


© Nelohagen


© Nelohagen


© Nelohagen

  • Architects: Genoveva Carrión Ruiz
  • Location: Barcelona, Spain
  • Illustrator Of Ceramic Murals: Sergio Membrillas
  • Area: 70.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2015
  • Photographs: Nelohagen

© Nelohagen

© Nelohagen

From the architect. Reform project for the fence of the plot located at Santiago Apóstol 22 Street: replacement of pedestrian and traffic metal gates and works of superficial improvement of the existing enclosure without demolition of any element.

L’Eliana is a municipality near Valencia, which in the 1970s developed large housing estates on the outskirts. Carmen Ruiz Navarro and Clemente Carrión Mateu, my parents, have finished their house in plot No. 22 of Santiago Apóstol Street, and, 25 years later the entrance gate is broken and they need a new door. So then, a door for my parents with something else, of course.


© Nelohagen

© Nelohagen

Door

As the title says, the first need and goal of the project was to solve a door. Not just one, two, to be exact. Without being able to assume any type of demolition of any element already constructed, with the exception of the already deteriorated door existing, it addresses, on the one hand, the access door rolled, and, the pedestrian door. Each one of them with their free holes marked by the existence of the wall already constructed of closure.


© Nelohagen

© Nelohagen

RAL 6019

The fence is practically a horizontal line. With the project there is an effort to generate, veils that will deform the fence until it becomes a foliated structure that shelters nuances and attends to the two situations that will be through it, the step walking and the step with a vehicle. The color refers to modernist and precious work, breaking with a canon of standardization through the recovery of another canon in disuse.


© Nelohagen

© Nelohagen

Before / After

Before / After

© Nelohagen

© Nelohagen

http://ift.tt/2isBlFu

T Concept Apartment / Itay Friedman Architects


© Boaz Arad

© Boaz Arad


© Boaz Arad


© Boaz Arad


© Boaz Arad


© Boaz Arad


© Boaz Arad

© Boaz Arad

From the architect. Transforming this apartment into a working/living space was the trigger for the renovation. The requirements where simple: Dividing the space into two self-sustaining units intertwined into one.


Floor Plans

Floor Plans

As the division strategy took shape, the T concept was born, creating a constructed separation of plasterboard walls and carpentry to utilize every cubic meter, both for use and storage.


© Boaz Arad

© Boaz Arad

© Boaz Arad

© Boaz Arad

The strategy was to create a division wall that acts as both an axis element and a functional storage space. The division created one dilemma, which would enforce a feeling of a smaller living space. To deal with this, the white color was chosen as a predominant feature to give the space a cleaner, lighter effect.


Diagram

Diagram

The client wanted to retain the Altbau (Old building) feeling, of the former workers dwellings, within the typical Berlin “style”, allowing us to reinstall old building elements alongside modern ones.


© Boaz Arad

© Boaz Arad

The result followed the theme of creating within a small budget a spacious living/working environment within a small space.

http://ift.tt/2ioHYX4

Peacock Technology / .DWG


© Bhavesh Raghavani

© Bhavesh Raghavani


© Bhavesh Raghavani


© Bhavesh Raghavani


© Bhavesh Raghavani


© Bhavesh Raghavani

  • Architects: .DWG
  • Location: Surat, Gujarat, India
  • Design Team: Jitendra Sabalpara, Bharat Patel, Dinesh Suthar, Bhavika Suthar
  • Art Students: Shiv Patel , Aaksh Jakhru, Ekta Kajiwala, Vibhor Gohil, Rohan Patel, Palak Patel, Nikhil Patel, Jay Davra, Rahul Suryvanshi, Yash Ghori, Kalpita Patel, Jagruti , Pooja, Bhavna Shah, Mahiti Virani, Mansi , Jeenu Atal, Simran , Kajol Khana , Devi Diwasaliwal
  • Area: 488.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: Bhavesh Raghavani

© Bhavesh Raghavani

© Bhavesh Raghavani

From the architect. The project came to us to convert an old unused building in to a work place for a software company called Peacock Technology. The site is located in Special Economic Zone, Icchapor at Surat (Gujarat). The client was inspired by the big tech companies where the working environment is informal and working is fun. The major constraint was the tight budget. So we had a need to find the alternative method of designing and execution. 


© Bhavesh Raghavani

© Bhavesh Raghavani

To cut down the cost, best way is to reduce resources, use more of recycle/ reclaimed materials and try to reuse the old scrape in to new way. As it was a tech company and as we know computer produces lots of waste materials as keyboards, floppies, old CDs, etc… moreover Surat is very old city and there are lots of old wooden house in the city which are demolished and the elements of the houses are sold in the scrape market. So we found this as the best way to incorporate the architecture of the city in to our interior.


© Bhavesh Raghavani

© Bhavesh Raghavani

1st Floor Plan

1st Floor Plan

© Bhavesh Raghavani

© Bhavesh Raghavani

We found the paper tubes, old packaging wood, car tyres, glass bottles, unused old GI plumbing pipes, machine gear plates etc… from the scrape yards. Wooden elements such an entrance door, stool legs, reception desk legs, some old furniture’s etc… were found from the old houses of city. Moreover student of fine arts were appointed to make the paper lampshades, partition from the ropes, and benches. 


© Bhavesh Raghavani

© Bhavesh Raghavani

In-terms of layout the whole site is divided in three parts and the central portion is used for entrance foyer, reception and lounge area which is extended to outdoor seating area. The reception core bifurcate the working area in to two parts. Furthermore, the spaces were designed in such a way that allowed transparency and interaction among the staff, that could help to build the “peacock culture” as the client says. 


© Bhavesh Raghavani

© Bhavesh Raghavani

In such working environment many time someone need a small formal quite place to attend phone calls and client meetings. So idea of telephone booth came in to picture. And we used the booth in red color, seen at London, very striking element in the space. Moreover Green, Black and Blue cabins were designed for distinct discussions and meetings.  


© Bhavesh Raghavani

© Bhavesh Raghavani

http://ift.tt/2isKqOF

MeePark / Lattitute


© Hector Peinador

© Hector Peinador


© Hector Peinador


© Hector Peinador


© Hector Peinador


© Hector Peinador

  • Architects: Lattitute
  • Location: Beijing, China
  • Principal Architect: Manuel N. Zornoza
  • Project Architects: Jorge Cortés de Castro, Andrea Ramos Rodriguez
  • Area: 700.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: Hector Peinador
  • Team: Manuel Coves Botella, Maria Diaz Martin, Zhang Wen
  • Client: BlueFocus Communication Group Co Ltd
  • Budget: 350,000€

© Hector Peinador

© Hector Peinador

From the architect. At the beginning of 2016, BlueFocus Communication Group decided to develop a series of venues in multiple locations across Mainland China. The first was then established in Beijing, at the same location used for the Group’s Headquarters, a former Panasonic factory complex of recent renovation. Such a decision is an unmistakable reflection of the company’s priorities, to evolve in China from a manufacturing power into a creative force, under the leadership of its charismatic Chairman Mr. Zhao Wenquan. 


© Hector Peinador

© Hector Peinador

For this end, BlueFocus selected a 700-sqm industrial building, with a free height of 8.50m, established in a north-south orientation, to be renovated and become the venue for the group’s events. The “MeePark” concept provides a space to host events for a diverse group of clients, ranging from local entrepreneurs and SME’s to multinational corporations such as PepsiCo and Volkswagen.


© Hector Peinador

© Hector Peinador

Diagram

Diagram

© Hector Peinador

© Hector Peinador

The design strategy divides the space into two main zones: the F&B service area located in the north and the events zone located in the south. When a guest uses the main entrance on the north side, the F&B service zone functions as a reception area, providing diverse facilities such as a wardrobe, signature tables, washrooms and an area to take pictures. On the second floor, guests can find a casual dining area facing towards the vast space provided by the double height of the entrance.


Diagram

Diagram

Diagram

Diagram

The events zone is an 8.50m high space where pre-existing trusses have been left visible as a heritage from the old factory, now reborn as a multifunctional space. The main area is equipped with all sorts of elements than can transform the space in a matter of minutes: a big LED screen descends from the ceiling; the stage area appears from the left side wall; benches open up to create a sitting area on the right. All these artifacts provide a transformative space that successfully deals with different activities and events: from product presentations or debates to live music concerts.


© Hector Peinador

© Hector Peinador

© Hector Peinador

© Hector Peinador

The material selection ranges from concrete and wood for the flooring to polycarbonate, glass and steel for the walls. This selection highlights the technological nature of the space, with a series of eye-catching LED screens that allows different presentation formats. 


Material

Material

MeePark will become an ideal platform for people to meet, socialize, hold activities and share innovative ideas. The space is a symbol of the narrative of China as a country: evolving from being the factory of the world to promoting local consumption of its own products.


© Hector Peinador

© Hector Peinador

http://ift.tt/2iosPVS

Duplex & The City / Luigi Rosselli Architects


© Edward Birch

© Edward Birch


© Edward Birch


© Justin Alexander


© Justin Alexander


© Justin Alexander


© Edward Birch

© Edward Birch

From the architect. Equivalent to the brownstones of New York, this interwar duplex is a humane scale solution to housing in the Sydney city fringes. 


Sketch

Sketch

Shoulder to shoulder with other apartment buildings, the original 1920s two-storey flats were transformed into a four storey block with a basement carpark and cellar, a ground floor garden apartment and a two-storey penthouse.   


© Justin Alexander

© Justin Alexander

Just forty-percent of the existing structure was demolished, mainly the dysfunctional rooms at the back of the property, which were replaced by a modern four-storey structure.  


Ground Floor Plan

Ground Floor Plan

1st Floor Plan

1st Floor Plan

2nd Floor Plan

2nd Floor Plan

The front of the property, with its original Queen Anne leadlight windows, liver toned brickwork and timber shingles, was left intact to preserve the building’s consistency with the prevailing style of the street.  No one would believe that behind those refined front rooms the apartments would morph into modern open living spaces with generous terraces that allow the inhabitants to admire the views of the city, populated with skyscrapers designed by Renzo Piano, Sir Norman Foster and Ingenhoven Architects, and enjoy glimpses of Sydney Harbour beyond.


© Justin Alexander

© Justin Alexander

The duality of the design also reflects the personalities of the residents: urbane and loaded with old world culture and family history, yet passionate about modern art, architecture and urban living.  Here the interior architecture plays greater role than in a more spacious suburban setting. 


© Justin Alexander

© Justin Alexander

The use of every millimetre has been carefully planned to condense the content of a large house into this city pad, with an eclectic collection of furniture and art; the skilful joinery design by Project Architect, Jane McNeill aimed to provide as much storage as possible for the owners, while lending elegance to the interiors in touches such as the dressing table in the dressing room. 


© Justin Alexander

© Justin Alexander

The cultured owners could not part with their books, so Jane created for them a library and study area with room for a comfortable arm chair, tucked beside the Jacobs Ladder stair that climbs to a glazed roof hatch and a landscaped roof terrace and a spa pool with a city skyline backdrop.    


Sketch

Sketch

Product Description. The JWI vertical louvre system has been used on the rear northern extension of the building which faces both Sydney city and harbour views and an adjacent laneway-like road.  The primary purpose on the louvre system is to provide a controlled method of adjusting levels of privacy and light, whilst allowing glimpses of harbour and city views. The louvres set up a horizontal band of anodised aluminium matching the finish of the window frames, and gives the northern facade a dramatic contrast of textures.

http://ift.tt/2isCDAi

americasgreatoutdoors: Mother Nature shows her power with this…

americasgreatoutdoors:

Mother Nature shows her power with this dramatic lightning storm over the Needles District at Canyonlands National Park in Utah. Photo from last summer courtesy of Claudia Castillo. 

Ending the year with our most popular post on Tumblr in 2016: This dramatic shot of a lightning storm over Canyonlands National Park in Utah.

From all of us at the Interior Department, have a safe and happy new year. And here’s to amazing adventures and exploring America’s great outdoors in 2017!

Cozy Woodland Cabin Retreat In Ontario

Go Home Bay Cabin by Ian MacDonald (10)

Go Home Bay Cabin is a residential project designed by Ian MacDonald. It is located in Ontario, Canada. Go Home Bay Cabin by Ian MacDonald: “The site for this house is a 55 acre parcel of gently sloping meadow on the Niagara Escarpment overlooking the Beaver Valley, two hours north of Toronto. An existing barn located close to the Township road bordering the south edge of the property, lends rural..

More…