#photography #canada #landscape #pics #photos #pic #nature #travel #tourism #picture #pictures #photo #beautiful #beautifulview #amazing #amazingview #travelguru #travelgurus #photoshoot #river #forest

#photography #canada #landscape #pics #photos #pic #nature #travel #tourism #picture #pictures #photo #beautiful #beautifulview #amazing #amazingview #travelguru #travelgurus #photoshoot #river #forest
photography canada landscape pics photos pic nature travel tourism picture pictures photo beautiful beautifulview amazing amazingview travelguru travelgurus photoshoot river forest

The Forest’s Awakening – 森の覚醒 by EliaLocardi

There’s nothing better than spending a morning all alone in the Sagano Bamboo Forest near Kyoto, listening to the soft rustling sounds of tall stalks and leaves as the sway gently in the breeze. On a clear morning, the light shines brilliantly though the tangle of beautiful green, making the forest seem as though it’s illuminated from within. It’s a truly extraordinary place to be.

If you’re interested in my work, feel free to drop me a line on Instagram or my website EliaLocardi.com.

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Halloween Forest by kilianschoenberger

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Today in the morning I involuntary plundered right into a struggle between these two tree ghosts. The trees have eyes. Sometimes it’s really scary out there in the woods with those gnarled trees around shrouded by fog and dimly lit by the twilight of the dawn

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Fog by MF-Photography

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…this is a foggy Morning in the Woods i hope you like it and thank you for a awesome Time 😉

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Reconciliation by davidrichterphoto

For too long the winter has been holding out this year to make a strong comeback this past weekend with temperatures deep into the arctic range. On the crest of the Ore Mountains, the sun was able to burn off the heavy fog for short periods of time. Fortunately, I found myself in a birch forest dotted with small beech trees and the occasional spruce and fir, all covered in a thick layer of rime ice.

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Sacred Pine Trees #1 by JUNHO

Samneung(Three royal tombs) in Gyeongju Bae-dong, Korea.

Samreung Pine forest is one place among the most beautiful places in Korea.
Large, small, thin, and thick pine trees meander as they please.
Why are the pine trees of Gyeongju the only ones in the city that are winding?
According to one opinion, this could be attributed to the Silla era, when more than 170,000 houses existed.
To build such a city, a huge number of woods were probably needed, and as the people cut the large and straight pine trees for such purpose, only the small and bent ones eventually managed to survive for use by their descendants.
This place is more famous as a forest with such pine trees rather than as royal tombs.
Particularly in spring, when the azaleas blossom among the pine trees, the place is filled with springtime picnickers.

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Avenue of the Clouds by tulatop

A little bit better if viewed on black.

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Sandy River Basin from Jonsrud Viewpoint・Sandy・Oregon・USA

Soft morning sunlight bathes a mixed Douglas-fir and black cottonwood forest partially ensconced in fog in this view of the Sandy River basin from high atop Jonsud Viewpoint. I was rolling with my boy Jeff Chen, who amusingly asked en route if he thought we’d be the only ones there to take in the sunrise. I knew there was little chance of that, what with this being just a mile off the main thoroughfare through the town of Sandy, Oregon, a common waypoint for Portlanders heading toward Mt. Hood by way of its southwestern approach. Not only that, we were cutting things close having decided at the last second to switch our morning destination from Chanticleer Point to here.

Sure enough, we managed to squeeze into the last remaining non-RV parking spot and wedged in tight between several other photographers already there. As I was setting up my gear, the gentleman to my left suddenly turned to me: “Are you Tula Top?” I don’t think he noticed, but I regarded him cautiously. After quickly but occultly eyeing him up and down to make sure he wasn’t harboring any scary shiny things on his person (e.g., badge, hand cuffs, gun, shanks, syringes), I replied in the affirmative. “I’m David Leahy, nice to meet you!” he said. And Facebook shrinks the world yet again.

It truly is flattering to have someone I’ve never met before aside from online circles recognize me in the field, but it’s happening more and more often. As you can see, David’s one heckuva photographer, and he managed to capture Mt. Hood on this morning in a dramatic fashion that I couldn’t quite pull off myself. Instead, I decided to focus on the vapors slithering through the forest like a white serpent and took advantage of the 300mm reach of my lens to compress the view. David came away with a similarly atmospheric image captured before the sun fully gained the eastern hills.

I came to learn that David is a schoolteacher, and a wonderfully dedicated one at that. Between frames we talked about his profession, about how I could name all of my homeroom teachers through grade school (Mrs. Zollo, Mrs. Klaas, Mrs. Cripe, Mrs. Irvine, Mrs. Schneider, Mrs. Klass again, and Mrs. Phelps) and how much gratitude I owed them for their patience and guidance. No jokes here: teachers are a wholly undervalued and underappreciated lot. Next to parents I think they hold the greatest ability to shape the character and enrich the experience of our youth, and those that took that supreme responsibility to heart will always hold a special place in mine.

So please, carry on, good sir. It was a privilege to meet you. 🙂

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